Trayvon Martin, LSD, the new face of hate (and other alternative news links)

Posted by Skylar Browning on Fri, Apr 6, 2012 at 11:01 AM

Every so often we pull together some recommended stories from other alternative news media. We haven't done it in ages, but it's snowing today and we figure you need something to help pass the time. Here are eight links for your weekend reading pleasure.

"I'm going to pray to God to bring justice to this town”
The Trayvon Martin shooting brought national attention to Sanford, and as public scrutiny mounts Orlando Weekly finds a city struggling with its reputation. The paper also has a slideshow of recent rallies.

covermag.jpg
They're not all in the Flathead
The 10th American Renaissance Convention attracted 150 attendees—from California to Maryland, from Canada to England, France and beyond—to Tennessee's Montgomery Bell State Park in March. They were there, according to the Nashville Scene, to hear "a collective warning that decades of multiculturalism and racial mixing have eroded the vitality of white, European-derived culture, which can only be reaffirmed by a return to aristocratic rule." But this isn't your usual KKK, hate-group gathering. No, AmRen represents a different class of white separatism, and it's frightening.

High fashion
The Stranger highlights 10 items of clothing and accessories from 10 local designers. It's a click-worthy list of couture, but one steals the show: "An art leotard inspired by taxidermy, animal cages, and messy love stories."

Operation Midnight Climax
SF Weekly explains how the CIA dosed S.F. citizens with LSD more than 50 years ago. You have to read it to believe it.

Why do people keep lying down in Minnesota traffic?
That's the question City Pages asks after five similar suicides occurred on local highways within the last five months. Explains one officer to the paper: "It's most difficult on the scene for the person who hit them. They don't know what to do. They're not guilty of a crime or anything. You just try to help them the best you can, and send them on their way."

Made for television
Westword wonders why Hollywood continues to be obsessed with the Columbine shooting 13 years later and even though there have been hundreds of other similar incidents. A new Lifetime miniseries is just the latest example. As one person who was in the school that fateful 1999 day says, "A miniseries? That's like the fucking straw that broke the camel's back."

Stop being broke
Willamette Week offers some directions on the road to fiscal recovery, like how to get out of debt, how to get a loan and how to invest (even if you don't know the first thing about investments). The Indy did a similar version of this package years ago ("a cheat sheet to making ends meet") if you need some local advice.

Add a comment